Jun 27, 2024

Going the Distance for a Second Chance

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Read about four animals whose lives were transformed when they were transferred to DCHS to receive ongoing veterinary care.

Thanks to your incredible support, Dane County Humane Society (DCHS) has highly skilled veterinary staff right here in our facility who can perform emergent and routine medical procedures for our animals. As we grow our Shelter Support Program, we can perform those procedures for animals in the care of other animal welfare groups — and even transfer animals with more extensive and ongoing medical needs to DCHS, thus saving more lives. Read four of those stories below!

Winston

Winston arrived at DCHS from the National Mill Dog Rescue after he was discarded by a commercial breeding facility. He needed a neuter and extensive grooming, and he also had a damaged eyelid gland that required surgery to repair. Once he recovered from his medical procedures, he was ready to go home with his new family.

Castiel

Castiel was rushed to a Madison emergency veterinary clinic by the Carl W. Nelson Animal Shelter because he was suffering from a urinary obstruction. After it was cleared, he was slowly recovering, but he needed ongoing follow-up care that could only be performed at a facility with veterinary staff onsite. He was transferred to DCHS to receive this ongoing critical care, which included a urinary catheter and an esophageal feeding tube. After he recovered, he was adopted in just six days.

Stanley

Stanley began his journey to healing at Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Care and Control after he was found wandering loose. X-rays revealed damage in his hips causing pain and limited mobility. He would need surgery to live a pain-free life, but the procedure was beyond his original facility’s abilities. Usually, this would force a difficult decision, but DCHS was able to take Stanley in and provide the care he needed. He recovered from his surgery with a foster family who ultimately realized they couldn’t imagine life without him.

Sam

Sam came to DCHS from Green County Humane Society for a neuter and exam of his left eye. During his exam, our veterinary staff determined Sam’s eye needed to be removed and that he had severe dental disease, which would require extracting all of his remaining teeth. He was officially transferred into DCHS’s care so he could receive eye and dental surgery. Sam needed some time to recover from the extensive procedures and received regular follow-up exams from DCHS’s veterinarians. After he had fully recovered, he was adopted within three days.

Helping Fellow Animal Groups Save Lives

DCHS’s new Shelter Support Program provides medical care and surgical services to other shelters and rescues in need.

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Have Stethoscope, Will Travel

Helping Fellow Animal Groups Save Lives: DCHS’s new program provides medical care and surgical services to other shelters and rescues in need.

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Jun 27th, 2024

Going the Distance for a Second Chance

Read about four animals whose lives were transformed when they were transferred to DCHS to receive ongoing veterinary care.

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