Jul 16, 2023

Intern Q&A: Was There a Wildlife Event that was Significant to You?

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We asked two of our summer interns if there was a wildlife event that was significant to them and why was it special. Read their answers below.

“One of my favorite cases is of #23–0250, the House Finch also known as “Blue 176” for the color band on his leg, or “Baldy” because of the missing feathers on his head. I think he’s special because he was one of the first patients I helped that made a major comeback, along with #23–0174, the female conjunctivitis House Finch that got released. Both birds started off isolated, with different injuries, and gradually made it outside! I was excited to see how quickly they healed/grew, and I feel a sense of accomplishment in their journey as I helped prepare feedings or hold them for medications.”

Kaitlyn Becker, Summer Wildlife Rehabilitation Intern

Top photo: House Finch fledgling #23-0250 shows his re-grown scalp after being admitted with a severe head injury. Initially, his head was fully scabbed, which took time to heal, eventually fall off, and reveal a new layer of skin underneath.

Mallard fledglings #23-0299 and #23-0307 swim together in the large pond of the Duck Pens.

“An event that was significant to me was when I went on my first mallard release. Waterfowl was my first rotation as an intern, so I was able to work with all the admitted ducklings as hatchings from the beginning. It was really fun to watch them grow up every day in the Sundance Center and to help move them out to the Runs, and eventually the Pens. I was happy to help them on their journey to recovery and release, from little hatchlings to outdoor fledglings. So, when it was finally time to release one of the first groups of mallards, I was very excited to watch my work pay off as they were dropped off into the wild and paddled away.”

Lucy Ault, Summer Wildlife Rehabilitation Intern

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